Category Archives: Home Builders

Country Girl Miley Cyrus Buys $5.8M Tennessee Mansion

Miley Cyrus might be singing about ‘Malibu,’ but she’s done buying houses there. The Disney-actress-turned-pop-star just picked up a new $5.8-million pad in Franklin, TN.

This is Cyrus’ first home purchase in her birth state, but she’s been on a shopping spree in California over the past couple of years. In 2015, she bought a horse ranch in Hidden Hills, and 2016 called for a Malibu bungalow.

The latest addition to Miley’s collection is a sprawling 5-bed, 6-bath manse nestled on 33+ acres.

Photos from Zillow listing.

The home boasts classic Southern features including a wraparound porch and a screened-in sun room (with an indoor porch swing!). Inside the 6,869-square-foot estate, hardwood floors, a soaring stone fireplace, red brick accents and vintage exposed beams contribute to a rustic vibe.

A pool and mini-golf course dominate the fenced-in backyard. If you’re not taking a dip in the pool, then the yard is really best experienced from a second-story deck that sits atop the sun room and overlooks the property’s private 33 acres.

This home purchase comes hot on the heels of Miley’s announcement that she’s releasing a new album — one that many are speculating might be a return to her country roots. While a home purchase is hardly definitive proof, it is another signal for fans anxiously anticipating her next move.

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"Where Should I Keep My…?": Solving the Ultimate Small Space Dilemmas

When you’re renting, square footage is something to be savored, not squandered. It’s hard enough finding a home for your everyday must-haves, let alone bulky, infrequently used, or offseason items like snowshoes,  pool toys, and holiday decorations.

Whatever your hobby or collection, there’s an organizational hack to help you store it. Here are some clever storage tricks for six of the toughest, bulkiest space-takers you may own.

Offseason wardrobe

Tuck those bulky winter sweaters (or shorts and flip-flops) in plastic bins under your bed. If your bed’s too close to the ground, lift it up with sturdy wood blocks. Even a few extra inches create enough space for a sizable storage container.

If elevating the bed isn’t an option, maximize your closet space with a few sets of cascading hangers. Put blouses on one set and T-shirts on another, and you’ll most likely double your closet space.

Extra linens

Extra pillows, comforters, and bedsheets are great for guests, but not so great for your small space. Try vacuum storage bags – stack your items inside, and use your vacuum cleaner to remove the air. Your items will shrink significantly so you can store them under your bed or on a shelf.

Shoe collection

A burgeoning shoe collection can take on a life of its own if not properly corralled. Take it back to dorm-room days with an over-the-door shoe organizer. These college favorites are popular for a reason – they store a dozen pairs of shoes or more, plus scarves, baseball caps, belts, and chunky necklaces.

Bikes

Bikes can be one of the most difficult belongings to stash, especially if you don’t have a deck or basement. Try installing a strong hook in the wall, and hang your bike by the front tire. Pro: It’s a great way to get the bike off the floor. Con: It still protrudes into the room.

For a less invasive option, hang your bike flush against the wall – like you’re hanging a piece of art. The hardware can be as simple as two wooden dowels that support the bike’s horizontal bar. )(Just make sure you anchor the supports in the wall’s studs so they can hold the weight.)

Exercise equipment

An inflatable exercise ball is a great workout aid – and a real space suck. You could always deflate it, but the hassle probably isn’t worth it. So, why not get creative and make it a usable piece of furniture?

Repurpose medium or large exercise balls as dining room chairs, and store them under the dining table when you’re done.

No room for a dining table? The bike trick applies here, too. Install a couple of dowels high up on the wall, and set the ball there until you’re ready for a crunch session.

Decorations and keepsakes

Have a collection of things you just can’t get rid of? Maybe old photo albums, holiday decorations, or crafting supplies? Strategically placed shelves are your storage lifesaver when seeking space for infrequently used items.

There’s often a wealth of unused space above and behind your hung clothing in bedroom and hallway closets. While shelves in these locations may require a footstool or flashlight to access, it won’t matter if you only need the items a few times a year.

Top photo from Zillow listing.

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3 Design Tricks That Will Make Your Small Space Feel Big

Do you have a small space in your home that you’re unsure what to do with? Or is your cramped apartment forcing you to be creative in your living arrangements? You’re not alone.

Make your small room or living area fit your needs with clever solutions that will streamline your life and maximize your space.

Paint can work wonders

Choosing the right paint color for your small room can instantly give the impression of more space or emphasize its cozy feel. Traditional neutrals like white, cream and light gray are great choices because they provide a clean and streamlined look, while making the room feel brighter and more expansive.

Painting the ceiling white to draw the eye upward is an easy way to create visual openness overhead. You’ll have an airy and inviting space in no time.

paint it white
Courtesy of Orlando Soria.

On the other hand, if you want to play up the small space vibe even more, go bold with dark colors. It’s a fun and unique design choice to emphasize the smallness of a room by making a cozy den-like atmosphere with colors like black, dark gray and navy.

paint it black
Courtesy of Allison Lind.

Whether you decide to go light or dark, adding paint to your small space will help you get the effect you are going for in a quick and budget-friendly way.

Savvy storage

With tight spaces, there isn’t always room for all the storage needed for belongings, clothing, office supplies and more. By incorporating creative and flexible storage solutions, you can easily keep clutter out of sight, while still keeping everything you need handy.

For example, the kitchen is a great place to implement clever storage. Roll-away islands and pantries create an adjustable cooking area to fit your needs.

kitchen storage
Courtesy of Sandra Bird.

Add storage by using the space beneath your cabinets for hanging spices or wine glasses, and attaching holders to the backs of cabinet doors to keep foil and cleaning supplies neatly out of sight.

Don’t forget about uncommon spaces like ceilings for hanging items like bicycles out of the way, or adding shelving high up in closets for rarely used items.

Multi-tasking furniture

When you have limited floor space, it’s important to make your furniture work double duty. Choose pieces that have hidden storage and multiple functions, or can be compacted and stored when not in use.

Photo from Zillow listing.

If you can’t fit a dresser in your bedroom, try using drawers or crates under the bed for clothing and extra linens. A pouf or leather ottoman can easily transition from a seat to a footrest or side table.

Add function to your entryway by employing a bench with storage inside to hide extra shoes, gloves, and scarves. And if you have wall space to spare, hang a fold-down dining table.

folding table
Photo from Zillow listing.

Using modular pieces that can serve different purposes or fold out of the way frees up room to make your space comfortable and livable for you and your guests.

Limited square footage doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice function and style. Small space living is a great way to lead a simplified and streamlined life. With creative thinking, you can go from a cluttered, cramped mess to an organized and inviting space with room for all.

Top image from Zillow listing.

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Originally published August 19, 2015.

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5 Retro Decorating Trends That Deserve a Comeback

Some home decor looks are just too good to let go. The boldly colored kitchen cabinets of the ’50s are taking on a sophisticated modern look. The late ’80s country kitchen look is enjoying new life – minus the gingham frills and bonneted goose motif – in today’s farmhouse chic trend, and mid-century design has taken over the home furnishing offerings of retailers at every price point. Rattan furniture and velvet upholstery, both popular in the ’70s, are showing up in designer collections again.

Our pick for the decor trend  most deserving of a second chance? The brightly colored bathroom fixtures (and sometimes even matching tile) that became popular beginning in the 1930s, and evolved from cool pastels to the much-maligned avocado and harvest gold hues of the 1970s. We’re not seeing these offered new yet, but salvage stores are a great resource if you simply must have a mint green or bubble-gum pink sink for your bathroom renovation.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Here are some of the blast-from-the-past home decor looks designers are happy to have deja vu over.

’50s-style dens

We are loving the reemergence of the den or the basement as a gathering space. Instead of having family and friends centered around a 50-inch television in the living room, we’re seeing people move toward intimate areas like listening rooms for their favorite vinyls, or casual seating in the den with headphones and their iPads. This setup is more conducive for connecting and catching up, or simply taking time for one’s self – think wood paneling, updated and re-imagined bean bags in designer fabrics, and high-quality retro audio sound.

– Kerrie Kelly, Kerrie Kelly Design Lab

Photo by Brian Kellogg.

Macrame textile art

Macrame from the ’60s and ’70s, but with a whole new twist. I love the beautiful heavy knotted textile hangings as art, or the thin delicate hangings for room screens. [They can hold] hanging flower vases and even light fixtures. This time it’s all about texture with a Scandinavian vibe.

Susan M. Jamieson, ASID, Bridget Beari Designs, Inc.

Conversation pits

We want big living rooms with circular, sunken conversation pits. They need custom built-in sofas, space-age floating fireplaces hanging in the middle, and plush shag carpeting deep enough to swallow your foot. Give us this dedicated zone for hanging out with friends and family, a space that isn’t centered around a TV screen. Give us bold colors and wild graphic patterns on pillows. And, most importantly, give us a live-in housekeeper, because those shag carpets are a nightmare to keep clean.

– Chris Stout-Hazard, ROGER+CHRIS

Photo from Zillow listing.

The home design trend from the past I’d love to see make a comeback is the conversation pit. Our technology age has created a digital life and physical separation. The classic conversation pit promotes togetherness and community. The conversational pit arrangement organically encourages people to face each other with comfortable deep seating. It also can be an advantage in design strategy, with a flexibility to promote a stylish streamlined modern feel or a casual bohemian aesthetic. Inspiring our clients to ditch the television and engage with family and friends is part of our design practice, creating space as experience.

– Elena Frampton, Frampton Co.

Timelessly practical kitchen features

Two of our favorite features making a comeback lately are banquette seating and library ladders, especially in the kitchen. A lot of our projects are in the city, where space is at a premium. Banquette seating works great in a tight space, plus it creates additional storage opportunities under the bench. Same goes for the ladder: It’s all about space. If you don’t have to haul out a clunky ladder to access everything out of reach, you can double your kitchen’s storage capacity with cabinets or shelves that go all the way up to the ceiling.

– Jeff Pelletier,  Board & Vellum

Photo from Zillow listing.

Brass hardware and fixtures

Used in smaller doses like pull handles and faucets with a more sleek and modern shape, [brass hardware and fixtures] can really up your design game in a cool classy way. My favorite bathroom look right now is dark navy cabinets with Carrera marble quartz counters, oversized white sinks, and printed cement floor tile incorporated with brass pull handles and faucets.

– Christina El Moussa, HGTV’s “Flip or Flop” and SuccessPath

Photo from Zillow listing.

Top image from Zillow listing.

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3 Steps to Creating an Organized Entryway (Even If You Don't Have the Space)

Drop zones, mudrooms, utility rooms, entryways, “places to leave your stuff.” Whatever you choose to call them, these spaces are invaluable as a spot to kick off your shoes, drop your keys, and keep everything you’ll need for the next day right where you left it.

Sometimes these spaces can be hard to come by, especially if you live in an apartment or studio. Without organization, shoes usually end up piled in front of the door waiting to trip an unsuspecting victim, and an array of backpacks, mail, dog leashes and knickknacks can clutter your home to the point of embarrassment.

Photo from Zillow listing.

But having a dedicated, organized and stylish drop zone for all of your daily needs – and to welcome your guests – is absolutely achievable, no matter the size or design of your living space.

Try these tips to establish a functional entryway in a home of any size.

Make a little room

Since it’s generally not possible to remodel or add on to a rental apartment, you must work with what you have.

Try a narrow console table for tight hallways as a place to drop your keys or leave your outgoing mail.

If space is really tight and all you have is the wall behind your door, hang hooks for coats and bags so they stay off the floor.

Another small-space trick: Temporarily remove your coat closet’s door, and add a stool or small bench inside as a place to sit and take off your shoes – and still have room for coats.

If your apartment is inside a secure building, you may be able to leave out a basket or tray for shoes in the shared hallway.

Add functionality

A mirror can also go a long way in opening up and brightening tight areas by reflecting light and giving the illusion of more space.

Retailers like IKEA sell modern pieces that can be modified to fit narrow spaces or hung on the wall. Measure your desired entryway space, and find furniture that will make the most of the room you have.

Having dedicated spaces for accessories also will make your drop zone a functional center. A devoted bowl or hook to hang your keys, a folder to sort your mail, and a basket to keep your shoes in really makes a difference in the flow of your day.

Leave a message

Bump practicality up a notch by having a message center in your drop zone where you can pin important reminders or leave messages for family members. It’s a great way to keep everyone connected as they go in and out.

A docking station to charge all your electronics can also be useful here. Look for compact and small accessories that will fit your space, yet serve the purpose you need.

By customizing your drop zone with features you need that will fit your home, you’ll keep everything streamlined and easy to find when you need it.

See more entryway inspiration.

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Originally published December 3, 2015.

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Quiz: Can You Guess the Price of These Homes?

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Top image, as well as the first and last quiz images, from Zillow listing.

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Rachael Ray Is Selling Her Southampton Home for $4.9M

Photo: Shutterstock

Celebrity cook Rachael Ray and her producer husband, John Cusimano, are ready for new digs after being longtime owners in the Hamptons. The couple paid $2.1 million for their 3-bed, 5-bath Southampton estate in 2008.

Nearly a decade later, they are asking $4.9 million for the home, which was renovated during their ownership. In addition to being located in an exclusive Long Island zip code, the home sits adjacent to the Southampton Golf Club.

The 3,000-square-foot pad feels airy thanks to a white and beige color scheme throughout the home.

Unsurprisingly, a kitchen designed for both functionality and entertaining awaits the future owner. Guests can sit on a conveniently placed window seat in the middle of the wraparound counters while the cook selects a bottle of wine from the island’s built-in wine rack.

Photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

The backyard is also designed for entertaining, with well-maintained gardens, a blue stone patio and an enormous gunite pool. Also located on the 6+ acre lot is a pool house that boasts additional rooms for sleeping, living and entertaining – including a second kitchen.

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Rustic Homes for Sale: Farmhouses, Cabins and Country Estates

From the colonial cottages of the Northeast to the cedar cabins of the Northwest, rustic homes come in many shapes and sizes across the United States. With custom woodwork, exposed beams and more, these retreats embellish the landscape this country is known for.

The following 10 homes provide a glimpse into a variety of rustic styles. Sit back, relax and enjoy the views.

Blue Ridge, GA

118 Cross Rock Dr, Blue Ridge, GA
For sale: $315,000

Photo from Zillow listing.

Located in the Chattahoochee National Forest, this 3-bedroom, 3-bathroom cabin is a cozy Appalachian getaway. Relax in the hot tub while taking in beautiful views or play a game of pool in the recreation room. This charming cabin has everything you need for a leisurely retreat.

See more Blue Ridge homes for sale.

Roxbury, CT

85 Painter Ridge Rd, Roxbury, CT
For sale: $2.5 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

This small town has a history of attracting big names including Marilyn Monroe, who once resided in a Roxbury farmhouse. Nestled on over 45 pastoral acres, this 13,209-square-foot barn has been masterfully renovated to suit the desires of a creative owner. In addition to hosting over 6,000 feet of studio space, this 3-bedroom, 4-bathroom home has been outfitted with western-facing walls of glass and reclaimed redwood, chestnut and cypress.

See more Roxbury homes for sale.

Sagaponack, NY

98 Daniel’s Ln, Sagaponack, NY
For sale: $9.995 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

Originally built in 1896, this farmhouse unites countryside and oceanside living in a prime Hamptons location. Located on 1.1 acres of rich soil, the exterior is outfitted with infrastructure for hobby farming, a pool and spa. The restored, 5-bedroom, 5-bathroom interior features original wainscoting and molding.

See more homes for sale in Sagaponack.

Lopez Island, WA

784 Shoreland Dr, Lopez Island, WA
For sale: $1.399 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

Perched atop 4 verdant acres overlooking the Lopez Sound, this residential compound hosts two 2-bedroom, 2-bathroom homes with traditional Northwestern flair. Boasting multiple walls of windows and decks to take in the spectacular views, this compound feels like you’re on a private island.

See more listings in Lopez Island.

Jackson, WY

535 S Indian Springs Dr, Jackson, WY
For sale: $12.5 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

Situated on nearly 4 acres with a view of the Tetons and access to 10 miles of hiking and equestrian trails, this cabin is an outdoor lover’s dream. The 10,500-square-foot retreat is full of rustic touches including hand-hewn logs, cathedral ceilings and white oak floors. It also houses a wine room, movie theater and hot tub.

See more Jackson homes for sale.

Bostic, NC

188 Black Ridge Dr, Bostic, NC
For sale: $339,900

Photo from Zillow listing.

Local folklore claims Abraham Lincoln grew up in a Bostic cabin perched atop a hill much like this one. Whether or not the tale is true, this Yellowtop Mountain home is a quintessential rustic escape with lots of natural wood (and an indoor swing!). The property offers three levels of unobstructed mountain views and 7.4 acres of land to explore.

See more Bostic homes for sale.

Hartland, VT

36 Brothers Rd, Hartland, VT
For sale: $3.985 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

Originally built in 1850, this Cape Cod-style home is a refined flavor of rustic, mixing modern comforts with historical character. The property has over 279 acres of rolling meadows, forests, four ponds, three brooks, a barn complex and miles of interior roads and trails.

See more homes for sale in Hartland.

Egremont, MA

65 Shun Toll Rd, Egremont, MA
For sale: $3.5 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

Nestled on 26 acres in the Berkshires, this country estate is comprised of two restored 18th- and 19th-century barns as well as a 4-bedroom, 7-bathroom home. The property features several outdoor spaces to enjoy the gorgeous mountain views, including a tranquil pool with a panoramic vista.

See more homes for sale in Egremont.

Wayzata, MN

2870 Inner Rd, Wayzata, MN
For sale: $469,000

Photo from Zillow listing.

A private sandy beach on Lake Minnetonka is just steps away from this 2-bedroom, 2-bathroom log cabin. Combining rusticity with sleek, modern finishes, this stylish retreat also offers access to a lighted tennis court, playground, gazebo, auditorium and winter boat storage.

See more Wayzata homes for sale.

Milton, DE

2 Graves Farm Rd, Milton, DE
For sale: $2.999 million

Photo from Zillow listing.

Known as Sanctuary Farm, this property spans over 300 acres along the shores of Broadkill River. Both a beach and farm retreat, the compound offers a wide variety of recreational opportunities, including hunting, fishing and horseback riding. The interior of the log cabin features custom woodwork and stone finishes, complemented by an outdoor saltwater pool.

See more homes for sale in Milton.

Lead photo from Zillow listing.

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Designer Lookbook: VW Fowlkes' Simple-Meets-Sensual D.C. Home

In early 2011, VW Fowlkes, principal and founder of Fowlkes Studio in Washington, D.C., was struggling with a conundrum.

His clients, a husband and wife in their mid-forties, didn’t see eye to eye on the new design for their two-story, three-bedroom home in the historic Cleveland Park neighborhood.

The husband, who works in tech, “was a committed modernist who wanted everything white and super clean,” says Fowlkes. And the wife, who runs a public relations firm, “wanted everything organic and sumptuous and sensual with a natural patina. So we weren’t sure how to reconcile the directions we were getting.”

Bold patterns, rich textures

Choosing to tackle the kitchen first, VW chose a Mediterranean-style concrete tile that had a “timeless quality to it,” he says. “The graphic print was so bold, you could do nothing else to the space and it would still feel visually rich.”

The husband saw nothing modern in it, dismissing the rope-tie print as fuddy-duddy, but in the end, the pattern won out, and the solid walnut cabinet came next.

The wife “claimed to be super picky about the kinds of grains and wood species” she liked, Fowlkes says. “She said she wanted something natural, but she didn’t want it to look like a condo.”

After locating a woodworker who collected trees uprooted by Hurricane Irene, Fowlkes visited the property with his client, who walked around and chose the walnut tree of her choice for the cabinet.

The Maryland-based woodworker placed the wood in a drying kiln for four months so it wouldn’t warp, cup, or check while crafting the cabinets. Fowlkes also reinforced the back of the slab with steel rods for additional protection against curling.

“It’s clean and modern, but it’s also very sensual,” Fowlkes says of the cabinets, which feature a live edge on the bottom that reflects the tree’s shape. “We wanted to really express the nature of the material we were using. You can see some marks from the chainsaw at the edge where it was cut.”

The same woodworker provided the materials for the kitchen’s window seat and sliding barn door. The light pendants, made by Sundance Company, were chosen for their transparency, since they wouldn’t block the view of the cabinets from the dining room. “They’re not overly or self-consciously modern,” Fowlkes says, adding that they were hardly expensive.

Spacious room, warm accents

Upstairs, Fowlkes converted the tiny three bedrooms into a single master suite, which features the same walnut millwork and custom bronze hardware as the kitchen. In the closet, a little bronze hook pulls out for hanging up clothes, and the wide-plank pine floors lend warmth to the airy, white space.

Nature meets modern

For the bathroom, Fowlkes sourced a porcelain-style floor from Architectural Ceramics that resembles a concrete material. The bathtub and raised sinks are from Montreal-based company WETSTYLE. As with the kitchen, the plumbing fixtures have a living bronze finish that appealed to the wife’s interest in nature.

“We wanted it to feel like the whole room was a white box, and we brought in the vanity and closets almost like we’d bring in a Steinway or your grandmother’s Chippendale,” Fowlkes says. “They weren’t necessarily things that had always existed in the house – they’re more like furniture.”

Get the look at home

Fowlkes explains how to achieve a streamlined look in your own home.

  • Protect the wood. “The trick with using slabs of solid wood is to keep it from warping or cupping,” he says. “It needs to be very dry. Our slabs were in a kiln for several months.” Another tip: Make sure your hinges are sturdy enough to handle the extra-thick doors.
  • Spend wisely. Of course you want to love your home, but you don’t have to break the bank for every doorknob, drawer pull, or faucet. Noting the Brazilian slate tile in the wall of the shower, Fowlkes says, “You can use simple materials, and you can find things that’ll look great and kind of recede that are inexpensive.”
  • Hide the cable box. This is a common mistake that many homeowners make, Fowlkes says. “We forgot about them, and we had to go back and figure it out after the fact.” Not fun.

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5 Home Staging Tips From an Expert Flipper

You updated the plumbing, refinished the flooring, painted the walls. In short, your home renovation is finally finished, and you’re ready to put your flipped house on the market.

But before you do, follow these five home staging tricks that top house flippers use – if you do, you’ll likely see a quick full-offer sale coming your way!

Offer great curb appeal

Pulling up to their potential new home should be a joyful experience for buyers. Give them the great first impression they’re hoping for with curb appeal that conveys a genuinely warm welcome.

Stylish house numbers, updated porch lighting, a classy door color, charming outdoor seating, flowers in bloom, and a welcome mat seem like unimportant details, but they make all the difference.

When a house looks cared for on the outside, it lets buyers know the inside has been maintained, too.

Create ambiance

Once potential buyers step inside, give them a personal, emotional connection to the house. Remember to address all five senses:

  • Sight. Use flattering lighting throughout the house to brighten dark corners and create playful shadows. This includes canned lighting, floor and table lamps, hanging pendants, and under-counter spot lights.
  • Smell. Create a very subtle, pleasant scent throughout the house by lighting scented candles or plugging in an aromatherapy diffuser. Citrus, vanilla, and lavender are perfect choices. Make sure the smell is subtle, not overbearing.
  • Touch. Incorporate texture through textiles that entice touching, which promotes a personal connection to a space.
  • Sound. Turn on quiet music, hang wind chimes, or install a water feature to relax anyone touring the house.
  • Taste. It never hurts to have some cookies or a candy bowl ready! Also be sure to offer chilled bottled water.

By appeasing the five senses, you’re sure to help potential buyers connect to the house.

Embrace floor space

If there’s one thing every buyer is looking for, it’s square footage. Play up every inch of it for them!

To make the house feel spacious, put breathing room around monochromatic furniture, and hang mirrors to reflect windows and room openings. Hang drapes high (or don’t use them at all), place large artwork on the walls, and lay down oversized area rugs.

Choose furniture raised up on legs to create a sense of lightness, and use decorative knickknacks sparingly to increase surface space. Create a distant focal point, such as a plant at the top of the stairs or a beautiful pendant light at the end of a hallway.

Emphasize architectural details

Even if your house flip includes some quirky architectural details, it’s best to show them off rather than try to hide them. After all, a house’s personality is part of its charm.

For example, if there’s seemingly wasted space underneath a staircase, turn it into a reading nook. If there’s a giant fireplace, dress up the mantle and arrange furniture around it. Built-ins have a special place in everyone’s heart, so if your house has them, definitely show them off!

Play up a lifestyle

Remember, you’re not just selling a house, you’re selling a lifestyle. This means you shouldn’t forget to dress up the outside areas, such as the patio and backyard. If you want your buyers to feel at home, set up an outdoor dining scene, arrange lounge chairs around the pool, or hang a rope swing.

By showing buyers the kind of life they could be enjoying, you’re showing them it’s worth paying to get it.

Check out Success Path for more tips on real estate and renovation.

Top photo from Zillow listing.

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Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow.

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